Papyri Graecae Magicae

D.T. 237

Note: This spell is an example of a curse tablet inscription that tapers off and forms a triangle, as this translation from J. Gager (1992) reveals.

I invoke you, spirit of one untimely dead, whoever you are, by the mighty
names SALBATHBAL AUTHGEROTABAL BASUTHATEO ALEO SAMMABETHOR.
Bind the horses whose names and
images/likeness on this implement I entrust to you; of
the Red [team]: Silvanus, Servator, Lues, Zephyrus, Blandus,
Imbraius, Dives, Mariscus, Rapidus, Oriens, Arbustus; of the
Blues: Imminens, Dignus, Linon, Paezon, Chrysaspis, Argutus,
Diresor, Frugiferus, Euphrates, Sanctus, Aethiops,
Praeclarus. Bind their running, their power, their
soul, their onrush, their speed. Take away their victory,
entangle their feet, hinder them, hobble them, so that
tomorrow morning in the hippodrome they are not able to run
or walk about, or win, or go out of the starting gates,
or advance either on the racecourse or track,
but may they fall with their drivers, Euprepes, son of
Telesphoros, and Gentius and Felix and
Dionusios "the biter" and Lamuros. For AMUEKARPTIR
ERCHONSOI RAZAABUA DRUENEPHISI NOINISTHERGA
BEPHURORBETH command you. Bind the horses whose
names and images I have entrusted to you on this
implement; of the Reds: Silvanus,
Servator, Lues, Zephyrus, Blandus, Imbraius,
Dives, Mariscus, Rapidus, Oriens, Arbustus;
and of the Blues: Imminens, Dignus,
Linon, Paezon, Chrysaspis, Argutus,
Derisor, Frugiferus, Euphrates, Sanctus,
Aethiops, Praeclarus. Bind their running,
their power, their soul, their onrush,
their speed. Take away their victory,
entangle their feet, hinder them,
hobble them, so that tomorrow
morning in the hippodrome they
are not able to run or walk
about, or win, or go out
of the starting gates, or
advance either on the racecourse,
or circle around the turning point;
but may they fall with their
drivers, Euprepes, son of
Telesphoros, and Gentius and
Felix, and Dionysius "the
biter" and Lamuros. Bind
their hands, take away
their victory, their exit,
their sight, so that they
are unable to see their
rival charioteers, but
rather snatch them up
from their chariots
and twist them to
the ground so that
they alone fall,
dragged along
all over the
hippodrome,
especially
at the turning
points, with
damage to
their body,
with the
horses
whom
they
drive.
Now,
quickly.

 

(trans. J. Gager (1992), no. 9)