Games Magicians Play

No, not mind games … Well, actually, in a way, yes. There are a number of classic historical games that demonstrate esoteric principles or ideas. For example, there's the ancient Egyptian game Senet and the ancient Indian game Snakes and Ladders which both demonstrate principles of a cultural understanding around the afterlife. In more recent periods, there are a variety of games such as Tarocchi, a 14th century game which is played with and may have been the source for the tarot deck, or the imaginary Glass Bead Game from the book by Herman Hesse which has been a kind of holy grail for game designers to develop toward. Closer to home, there's Enochian or Rosicrucian Chess, which is a particularly complex variant of chess taught within the Golden Dawn system. In the last few decades there have been other games which more or less demonstrate some useful principles, more or less obviously so, such as the card came Fluxx, for which the rules change as the game is played, or the board game Gnostica, which uses tarot cards as a changing playing surface.

Come for an introduction to some of these games you may not have heard about previously, and have a chance to play some rounds with others.

Magick in Oz

There are a number of classic historical games that demonstrate esoteric principles or ideas. For example, there's the ancient Egyptian game Senet and the ancient Indian game Snakes and Ladders which both demonstrate principles of a cultural understanding around the afterlife. In more recent periods, there are a variety of games such as Tarocchi, a 14th century game which is played with and may have been the source for the tarot deck, or the imaginary Glass Bead Game from the book by Herman Hesse which has been a kind of holy grail for game designers to develop toward. Closer to home, there's Enochian or Rosicrucian Chess, which is a particularly complex variant of chess taught within the Golden Dawn system. In the last few decades there have been other games which more or less demonstrate some useful principles, more or less obviously so, such as the card came Fluxx, for which the rules change as the game is played, or the board game Gnostica, which uses tarot cards as a changing playing surface.

Here's some links specifically about Oz Fluxx and also some of my thoughts on Magick and Oz:

Oz Fluxx

Magical Work in Oz


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