Abraham Eleazar

Rabbi Abraham Eleazar aka Abraham the Jew aka Habraham (aka Abraham), the Jew, Prince, Priest, Levite, Astrologer and Philosopher to the Jews scattered in Gaul. May be fictional, perhaps his editor, Julius Gervasius of Schwarzenberg.

Germany @ 1700s

Comments

Alchemy; written as a Jew, but with a Christian introduction and additions, or perhaps by a Marrano aka Converso forced to renounce Judaism for Christianity. From the transliterations of the Latin of Hebrew words, it seems he was an Ashkenazi Jew, from Russia, Poland, Germany, etc like Worms, Germany rather than Sephardic speaker like the earlier Abraham Von Worms; Rosicrucian imagery;

Further complicating the historical situation of Age-Old Chymical Work aka Uralter Chymisches Werck, 1735 by Abraham the Jew aka Rabbi Abraham Eleazar is the earlier Abraham the Jew’s Sacred Magic of Abra-Melin the Mage, dated 1458, English in 1883. In his translation's introduction, MacGregor Mathers suggests this “earlier” (actually later) Abraham Eleazer might be the fore-bearer of the Abraham aka Abraham Von Worms who seeks out Abramelin, without any written explanation. (page xix, Book of Sacred Magic of Abra-Melin, 1974 edition). But the two works have nothing in common, the later being Alchemy with strong Christian and symbolism reminiscent of the Rosicrucians rather than Judaism, even heretical Judaism, while Abramelin is Jewish letter manipulation in grid format for talismanic purposes. Also, it would seem Abraham Von Worms predates Abraham Eleazar by 400 years, if we use the date in the manuscript, or 100 years if we use the publishing dates. One would expect a Jew from Poland and the Germanic areas to speak Ashkenazic Hebrew, with the harder K and Ch sounds, while the Latin transliterations on the Abramelin squares show the softer S and F sounds in the Latin substitutions, while the German in of Age-Old Chymical Work shows none of the typical Rabinic reasoning, constant reference to Torah, or over-explaining typical of the Jews.

Confusion between the two Abrahams is widespread, with synchronistic titles like “Sacred Book of Abra-Melin the Mage, as delivered to Abraham the Jew, Prince, Priest and Levite to that Tribe of Jews Who by the Wrath of God were Dispersed Amongst the Gauls” listed as Nicolas Flamel’s source rather than Uralter Chymisches Werck by Habraham, Jew Prince, Priest, Levite Astrologer and Philosopher to the Nations of the Jews Scattered in all Gaul – Salvation in our Lord – Book of the hieroglyphic Figures with applications of the Fables of the Poets of the Mysteries of Christianity, of Alchemy, Pharmacy, according to NUMBERs, , (see “http://quintessentialpublications.com/twyman/?page_id=49).

Connections

Teachers

Heraclitus aka Hercules;

Students

Master Canches; Master Anselim ; Nicolas Flamel; Adam McLean; Julius Gervasius of Schwarzenberg; Samuel Baruch, author of Donum Dei Samuelis Baruch … gefunden von Abrahamo Eleazare .., 1761 aka Kurzer doch deutlicher Schlüssel derjenigen fremden Wörter welche in Abraham dem Juden enthalten sind aka Donum Dei. Aka “Donum Dei Samuelis Baruch, des Juden Rabbi, Astrologi und Philosophi, gebohren aus dem Stamm ;

Friends

Enemies

Organizations

Author

Age-Old Chymical Work aka Uralter Chymisches Werck by Habraham the Jew, The Book of Hieroglyphic Figures with applications of the Fables of the Poets of the Mysteries of Christianity, of Alchemy, Pharmacy, according to NUMBERs aka Uraltes chymisches Werck, welches ehedessen von dem Autore Theils in Lateinischer und Arabischer, theils auch in Chaldäischer und Syrischer Sprache geschrieben, nachmals von einem Anonymo in unsere deutsche Muttersprache übersetzet, nun aber nebst zugehörigen Kupfern, Figuren, Gefässen, Desen, einer kurzen Vorrede, nöthingen Registern, wie auch beygefügten Schlüssel derer in selbigem vorkommenden fremden Wörter, ingleichen einigen philosophischen Regeln von dem Steine der Weisen zu Nutz und Gebrauch aller Liebhaber der edlen hermetischen Philosophie, in II. Theilen zum öffentlichen Druck befördert worden durch Julium Gervasium Schwatzburgicum, P.M. & I.P.E. 8° Erfurt: Augustinus Crusius 1735, then 1750, published by Julius Gervasius of Schwarzenberg @ 1760, engravings by F. N. Martinet;

In answer to an inquiry, Alchemy expert par excellence Adam McLean distinguishing between 3 books and authors, his reply was so quick and precise it bears quoting in full: “1). Rabbi “Abraham Eleazar” , author of Age-Old Chymical Work aka Uralter Chymisches Werck, 1735; A well-known work, written in German. Adam McLean recently published an improved edition of this, replacing the RAMS version. See http://www.alchemywebsite.com/bookshop/mohs55.html

3) Habraham (aka Abraham), the Jew, Prince, Priest, Levite, Astrologer and Philosopher to the Jews scattered in Gaul, author of The Book of Hieroglyphic Figures with applications of the Fables of the Poets of the Mysteries of Christianity, of Alchemy, Pharmacy, according to NUMBERs, at least published by 1760; The same German work as item 1, but reprinted in 1760 in Leipzig. You have here a translation into English of the title page. An English translation was issued as photocopied transcripts by Hans Nintzel in the early 1980s. It is easily available on the Internet. This translation is very poor in places.

2) Rabbi Abraham Von Worms, author of The Book of Abramelin aka The Jew Abraham of Worms's Book of the True Praxis in the Ancient Divine Magic and Astounding Things, as they have been transmitted through the Holy Kabbalah and Elohim @ 1350 This has nothing at all to do with the Rabbi Eleazar of items 1 and 2. As far as I understand The Book of Abramelin dates to about 1608 and was written in German. The Hebrew versions are all more modern i.e. later than 1740 and are translations of the German, rather than copies of earlier Hebrew manuscripts”* AM 4/21/2016

Compare at

http://www.akor.cc/Abramelin/abramelin_book1.pdf

So based on his analysis, he doesn't believe the “Abraham the Jew” of Abramelin is based on a historical figure. He does believe Rabbi Abraham Eleazar may have existed, or I think may have been a “beard” for his Christian editor Julius Gervasius of Schwarzenberg's ideas of Jewish Magick, or less likely John Cremer, the mythical Abbot of Westminster.

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