Hanni Jaeger

Hanni Jaeger illustration by Aleister Crowley

Hanni Larissa Jaeger

Hanni Jaeger dance pose

Hanni Jaeger, Hanni Larissa Jaeger; artist, model; the Monster, Soror Anu, a Scarlet Woman

  • Born c. 1911 at Bernau(?), Germany
  • Died 1932(?)

“[In Germany, Crowley] befriended Hanni Larissa Jaeger, a nineteen-year-old spitfire who shared Crowley's interest in painting.”—Richard Kaczynski, Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley, 246

“Miss Jaeger fucks everyone farewells”—Aleister Crowley diary, July 31, 1930 via Richard Kaczynski, Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley, 248, 653

“AC renamed the luscious Fräulein Jaeger as the Monster (he also gave her the magical name Anu) and began practicing sex magick with her. “—Richard Kaczynski, Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley, 248

“As they traveled, Crowley also trained the Monster to become his next Scarlet Woman.”—Richard Kaczynski, Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley, 450

“In that penultimate sentence, it's more accurate to say that Crowley's stunt was a grand romantic gesture to woo Hanni Jaeger & also a stunt to sell her elopement travelogue (which Crowley would ghost write), 'My Hymen.' Hanni Boca'd Crowley at the end of their relationship before disappearing back to California (laying the foundation for the urban legend that Crowley drove his girlfriends to suicide).”—https://twitter.com/richardkaczynsk/status/1352613200827740163

“Age nineteen, from Santa Barbara, California, artist and model Hanni Jaeger is a guest of Berlin artist and astrologer Hans Steiner.”—Tobias Churton, Aleister Crowley: The Beast in Berlin: Art, Sex, and Magick in the Weimar Republic, xxv

“From the pretty town of Bernau, 10 km northeast of Berlin, blond-haired, blue-eyed Hanni Jaeger was the daughter of Martha (1882–1966) and Hermann Jaeger (1879–1961), a farmer and market gardener who emigrated to the United States in August 1923, settling in Santa Barbara, Califronia. A year later he was joined by … thirteen-year-old Hanni.”“—Tobias Churton, Aleister Crowley: The Beast in Berlin: Art, Sex, and Magick in the Weimar Republic, 121

 

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