Miguel de Molinos

Greater Feast of Miguel de Molinos, Molinos, died December 29, 1697 at Rome, Italy in Hermeneuticon at Hermetic Library

Miguel de Molinos

“In more remote times, the constituent originating assemblies of the O.T.O. included such men as … Molinos”—Liber LII Manifesto of the O.T.O.

“That you may gain some insight into the nature of the Great Work which lies beyond these elementary trifles, however, we should mention that an intelligent person may gather more than a hint of its nature from the following books, which are to be taken as serious and learned contributions to the study of Nature, though not necessarily to be implicitly relied upon. … The Spiritual Guide of Molinos“—Liber E vel Exercitiorum sub figurâ IX

“I was also aware of the prime agony of meditation, the “dryness”) (as Molinos calls it) which hardens and sterilises the soul.”—The Psychology of Hashish

“Not so, however, the first, which is taken from “The Yoga by the Sâñkhya,” and which is reminiscent of the Quietism of Molinos and Madam de Guyon rather than of the operations of a ceremonial magician. And it was just this Quietism that P. as yet had never fully experienced; and he, realizing this, it came about that when once the key of Yoga was proffered him, he preferred to open the door of Renunciation and close that of Action, and to abandon the Western methods by the means of which he had already advanced so far rather than to continue in them. This in itself was the first great Sacrifice which he made upon the path of Renunciation—to abandon all that he had as yet attained to, to cut himself off from the world, and like an Hermit in a desolate land seek salvation by himself, through himself and of Himself. Ultimately, as we shall see, he renounced even this disownment, for which he now sacrificed all, and, by an unification of both, welded the East to the West, the two halves of that perfect whole which had been lying apart since that night wherein the breath of God moved upon the face of the waters and the limbs of a living world struggled from out the Chaos of Ancient Night.”—THE TEMPLE OF SOLOMON THE KING

“Youth strides on with hasty step, and by summer of this year — 1898 — we find P. deep in consultation with the mystics, and drinking from the white chalice of mystery with St. John, Boehme, Tauler, Eckart, Molinos, Levi, and Blake”—THE ACOLYTE

“It is monstrous and mschievous for liberal thinkers to call themselves Christians; their nominal adhesion delays the disruption of the infamous system which they condone. To declare oneself a follower of Jesus is not only to insult history and reason but to apologize for the murderers of Arius, Molinos and Cranmer, the persecutors of science, the upholders of slavery and the suppressors of all free thought and speech.”—Chapter 17

“They walked steadily through the Desert, invoking the Aethyrs, one by one, at convenient times and places, or when the Spirit moved them. As a rule, one Aethyr was obtained every day. Bou-Sada was reached on November 30th; on December 8th they started again through the desert for Biskra which they reached on December 16th, completing the work on the 19th. By the time Bou-Sada was reached, and they had arrived at the 20th Aethyr, the Seer began to understand that these visions were, so to speak, cosmopolitan. They brought all systems of Magical doctrine into harmonious relation. The symbolism of Asiatic cults; the ideas of the Qabalah, both Jewish and Greek; the Arcana of the Gnostics; the Pagan Pantheon, from Mithras to Mars; the Mysteries of Ancient Khem; the Rites of Eleusis; the Scandinavian Sagas; Celtic and Druidical ritual; Mexican and Polynesian traditions; the Mysticism of Molinos no less than that of Islam,— all these fell into their proper places without the slightest tendency to quarrel. The whole of the past Aeon, in short, appeared in detailed perspective, and each element therefore surrendered its sovereignty to Horus, the Crowned and Conquering Child, the Lord of the Aeon announced in The Book of the Law“—Introduction

“By the time I reached Bou Saâda and came to the twentieth Aethyr, I began to understand that these visions were, so to speak, cosmopolitan. They brought all systems of magical doctrine into harmonious relation. The symbolism of Asiatic cults; the ideas of the Cabbalists, Jewish and Greek; the arcana of the gnostics; the pagan pantheon, from Mithras to Mars; the mysteries of ancient Egypt; the initiations of Eleusis; Scandinavian saga; Celtic and Druidical ritual; Mexican and Polynesian traditions; the mysticism of Molinos no less than that of Islam, fell into their proper places without the slightest tendency to quarrel. The whole of the past Aeon appeared in perspective and each element thereof surrendered its sovereignty to Horus, the Crowned and Conquering Child, the Lord of the Aeon announced in The Book of the Law.”—Chapter 66

“Who shall help us here? Not the sonorous Vedas, not the Upanishads, Not Apollonius, Plotinus, Ruysbroeck, Molinos; not any gleaner in the field of à priori; no, a mere devotee of natural history and biology: Ernst Haeckel.”—Chapter XXVII: Structure of Mind Based on that of Body (Haeckel and Bertrand Russell)

Miguel de Molinos appears as Molinos in all versions of the Saints of Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica in Liber XV, published during Aleister Crowley's lifetime. Molinos is not on the full list of any version, and is therefore a name celebrated only at performances when the complete Saints Collect is read.

Gnostic Saint International Equinox Magick in Theory and Practice
Miguel de Molinos Molinos Molinos Molinos

 

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